Trevorrow Hall

THE CAMPUS

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the charter of Centenary University! To celebrate, the blog will be highlighting information from past posts about Centenary’s history.

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Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1874

Before Centenary University was built, the land it would sit on was a cornfield, described during the laying of the cornerstone in 1869 as “desolate – not a tree – not a shrub” (Custard, pg 10). The campus was also set far back from the still small town of Hackettstown, and planks had to be laid from Main Street to the Institute for people to travel on.

 

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C.C.I. Gymnasium

Over the next 30 years, several buildings were added to the campus; apart from the Main Building, the campus had two gymnasiums, a chemical laboratory, a barn, and an icehouse. Hundreds of trees and shrubs were also planted to make the campus feel “like a very pleasure garden” (Custard, pg 57).

 

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Centenary Collegiate Institute, 1902

The Great Fire of 1899 destroyed the Main Building but not the spirit of Centenary; a new Main Building and two separate dormitory buildings were built in two years. The institution remained largely unchanged until the start of the 1940s, when it was decided to expand the campus to fit its growing student population.

 

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Trevorrow Hall, 1950s

In rapid succession, the school (now known as Centenary Junior College) built Trevorrow Hall (1941), Lotte Hall (1949), Van Winkle Hall (1951), Taylor Memorial Library and the Reeves Student Center (1954), Brotherton Hall (1956), Washabaugh Hall (1962), Anderson Hall (1965), and the Ferry Arts and Music Building (mid 1960s, which expanded and renovated the original C.C.I. Gymnasium).

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Lackland Center, 2009

Another boom in growth began with the addition of an Equine Center (1978), the Harris and Betts Smith Learning Center (1996), Littell Technology Center (2003), Bennett-Smith Hall (2003), Founder’s Hall (2006), the John M. Reeves Student Recreation Center (2006, which expanded and renovated the original Reeves Student Center), and the Lackland Center (2009). Centenary also opened centers in Parsippany and Edison.

This information was pulled from multiple posts: The First Main Building, The Great Fire, Athletics, The Trees of Centenary, The Ways and Customs of Centenary College, and Trevorrow Hall.

TREVORROW HALL

Trevorrow Hall in the 1950s

Trevorrow Hall in the 1950s

trev005Within the past year, the college has seen a number of improvements on Trevorrow Hall, including updating science laboratories and lectures halls, as well as installing an elevator to the three-floor building.

Trevorrow Hall was one of the improvements to Centenary College set forth by the Reverend Doctor Robert Johns Trevorrow, president of the college from 1917 – 1943.

President Trevorrow came to Centenary Collegiate Institute during a period of financial crisis, and worked hard to pull the school out of debt. After 7 years of meticulously examining the college’s expenditures, Trevorrow was able to pay off a mortgage of $81,000! Having brought the school out of debt, he dedicated himself to creating his 10 Year Plan, which would invest in the college’s future through scholarships, curriculum reorganization, and a physical expansion of the campus.

The school was in dire need of more classroom space, and in 1940 a building was planned that would house Science, Home Economics, Art, and Clothing. During the Annual May Fete of 1941, the final stone was placed. The faculty suggested the name Trevorrow Hall. In the Centenary College history, Through Golden Years, author Leila Custard writes,“now at last there was adequate housing for the Departments of Science and Home Economics, while the Art Department glorified in its sky-lighted spaciousness and its gallery for special exhibits” (192).

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Clockwise from top left: Students in Home Economics, A lesson in fashion sketching and textiles, Laboratory Science, and a Chemistry presentation.

The building has remained relatively unchanged, with fashion classes on the first floor, sciences on the second, and art on the third.