Library Projects

LIBRARY NEWSLETTERS AND INFORMATION

The library has started publishing a newsletter we’re calling Unshelved – in it you’ll find information about events at the library, projects and initiatives we’re working on, and features on the staff and library work-study students you may meet here at Taylor Memorial Library.

newsletter headerMany public and academic libraries have newsletters, magazines, or pamphlets that talk about library happenings, and over the years we have seen our fair share of them!

library handbooks1Early informational handouts came in the form of library handbooks, which served as an introduction to the library. The 1955 Taylor Memorial Library Handbook includes a foreword that states, “before you have spent many days at Centenary you will find that this building is the center of many of your activities. If you are willing to devote a short time to becoming acquainted with its resources and arrangement, you will be able to find quickly and efficiently the material you wish.” These handbooks were published for several years, and included a description of the main areas of the library, a guide to using the card catalog and finding books, articles, and other library materials, and finally, a summary of library services and policies. As new library instruction programs were developed that took over many of these roles, we began printing different pamphlets that focused on specific library services. At one time, this library had several pamphlets on services and resources that included requesting an item from interlibrary loan, using specific databases, and on library policies.

library instruction menu snippetLibrary instruction programs are now more commonplace than ever; we actually offer several different types of instruction that range from a simple drop in visit to introduce library resources and services, to resource overviews that go in-depth on citations, plagiarism, researching, and other library skills. The need for a printed library handbook is largely non-existent, but in its absence, we’ve developed new ways of imparting information to our communities.

Over the past ten years, the library has created many different versions of a newsletter. Six years ago we published Shelf Talk, which talked about new library acquisitions and library events. The first version of Shelf Talk was created by a work study student named Sarah Malcolm. She delivered a new issue every month and dedicated a lot of her time at TML to the success of the newsletter. After her graduation from Centenary, we had difficulty selecting another work study who could focus on Shelf Talk with as much enthusiasm and talent as Sarah, and decided to put the newsletter on hiatus. Shortly afterwards, library assistant Jack Wooldridge ‘adopted’ Shelf Talk and created several issues. Unfortunately, with his departure, Shelf Talk was ‘shelved’ once again.

The idea to revisit Shelf Talk was always in the back of our minds, so the library staff decided to try a different type of newsletter. Instead of book reviews and new acquisitions, we are focusing on the events and initiatives of the library. With this new incarnation, we are hoping to show our community who we are and encourage people to learn more about the library – not just what we have, but what we do. Libraries have always adapted with the times, and Taylor Memorial Library is no stranger to that! We’re always experimenting with different ways of reaching out to our patrons, and we hope they enjoy learning more about the people behind the circulation desk!

spring 2020_online

To read the digital version, complete with clickable links, go here!

LIBGUIDES FACELIFT

The library’s website got a bit of a facelift recently! Well, just the Archives page, but still, it’s pretty exciting! We’ve added images of archival materials and expanded our digital media – now you can interact with a map of the trees on Centenary’s campus and check out our newest feature, digital exhibits! We’ll be highlighting some of the collections we have that you might not be familiar with – should we do that on the blog, too?

digital exhibits

digital collections.jpg

It’s not much, but it’s ours.

 

CURRENT LIBRARY PROJECTS

fall-japanese-zelkova

The fall color of the Japanese Zelkova.

The library staff has been working on a project to update Trees of Centenary, a 1990s dendrological* survey done by Dr. Lewis Parrish, the former department head of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Centenary.

trees-of-centenary-sitting

The tree cataloger and photographer consult the original Trees of Centenary.

Parrish’s book is a compilation of every tree on the Centenary campus, but that information is over twenty years old. The archives staff have taken on the task of updating Trees of Centenary to reflect the  foliage of the current campus. So far, the project has created an inventory of all trees on the north side of campus, including most of the trees listed in Dr. Parrish’s book. The south side of campus will be more challenging as there was no survey done of these trees, and complete identification will have to be done from scratch.

first-draft

An excerpt from the rough draft map of the Jefferson Lawn, south side.

How is this task being accomplished? First, every tree in Trees of Centenary was listed and separated by location. The campus was broken down into sections, and each section was given its own hand-drawn map. Then, staff members took the book and the maps and made, well, a mess (see the rough draft map at right). Each tree was numbered, plotted, and matched to a tree from the book. This proved to be difficult because some of the trees mentioned in the 1990s survey are now gone, claimed by disease or death, and new trees have been planted since the survey’s publication.

Realizing a more orderly system was needed, the rough draft map from each portion was input into excel spreadsheets, which became the basis of our new interactive map!

green-ash-in-fall

The fall color of the Green Ash.

This map shows the location of each tree and includes a description and photos, just like the original Trees of Centenary. 

There is still much to be done, and the library hopes to have the entire campus cataloged by Spring 2017. During the winter all the evergreens will be recorded while the remaining deciduous trees will be classified in Spring 2017. Staff will also be taking pictures of the trees in each season. This year’s fall color went by too quickly, but there’s always next year!

*Dendrological: adj., Having to do with the botanical study of trees and other woody plants.