Horses

THE AMUSEMENT

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the charter of Centenary University! To celebrate, the blog will be highlighting past posts about Centenary’s history.

Academics are an incredibly important aspect of a college education (hopefully the most important!), but many students found that their most memorable moments were spent outside the classroom.

150.08 The RecreationAside from classes and educational pursuits, students spent their free time enjoying outdoor activities. In Centenary’s early years, students went hiking, skiing, horseback riding, etc. Horseback riding was very popular, and there was a Riding Club for students taking riding classes, and an Outing Club that regularly scheduled excursions to local stables for all students. Swimming was also a popular pastime. In the 1930s, Centenary started hosting a yearly interclass swim meet. Each class competed in events including the egg and spoon race and ‘swimming with arms alone’. The 1940s marked the beginning of the Aquatic Club, which promoted interest in swimming, life-saving, and water fun.

One of the earliest and most accessible sources of extracurricular entertainment for students was academic. Students joined societies to strengthen their elocution, performed music or sang in recitals, and joined clubs that furthered their educational interests. The music department was the institute’s largest in its earlier years, and there were many musical clubs for students – The Mandolin and Banjo Club, The String Glee Club, the C.C.I. Concert Band, and the C.C.I. Orchestra, which thrived for many years. Students in Chorus gave town concerts and even produced records. Many students enjoyed activities that would help develop professional skills: Students in the school’s radio program spent their time planning radio shows. The radio station was directed by a member of the faculty and staffed by students in radio and television programs.

Let’s not forget social activities! Students had many yearly events for students as a chance to get to know each other better and to unwind. The school held several dances a year, each hosted by a different class. They also created the Winter Carnival with a winter themed dance, skiing, snow sculpture making, sleigh rides, and concerts. The Ice Breaker at the start of the school year welcomed new students to Centenary, and the Songs on the Steps at the end of the school year bid farewell to graduating Seniors. Students found many activities to entertain themselves while they were at Centenary.

 

 

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THE EQUINE PROGRAM

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A riding class c.1920

For almost a century, Centenary College has been involved in equine studies. In the 1920s – 1950s, Centenary had classes for horseback riding, and also offered riding as an extracurricular activity. There was a Riding Club for students taking riding classes, and the Outing Club regularly scheduled excursions to local stables for all students. In 1957, Centenary College held its first horseshow. A two-year Horsemaster program was added to the curriculum in 1973 and expanded to a four-year program in 1977. Centenary acquired a new Equine Facility in 1982, and retitled the horsemaster program to be called Equine Studies two years later. The Equine Studies program has become one of the most well known equestrian programs in the nation.

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Centenary’s first horse show, 1957

In 1999, the college broke ground on their new Equine Center. The new center is located on 65 acres of land in Long Valley and features 3 barns, 3 riding areas, and a hunt field. The equine program boasts an award-winning Equine Studies Program and nationally ranked riding teams. Equine students can earn an associate or bachelor degree in Equine Studies, and students in other degree programs can minor in Equine Studies. The Equestrian Center also offers a therapeutic riding program called TRAC (Therapeutic Riding at Centenary).

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2014 IHSA National Champions

The school has several different competitive riding teams: ANRC (American National Riding Commission), IDA (Intercollegiate Dressage Association), IHSA, (Intercollegiate Horse Show Association), and a Hunter/Jumper team. Centenary riding teams consistently rank at the top of intercollegiate riding competitions. The ANRC team twice hosted the National Collegiate Championships, with the National Team earning the Reserve Championship and the Novice Team winning the Novice Championship. In 2013 The National Team won the Championship. The IDA team finished fifth in the Inaugural Intercollegiate Dressage Association National Finals in 201, and has qualified for the National Finals every year since. The IHSA team won the IHSA Hunter Seat National Champion three times between 2009 and 2014, and won the coveted Cacchione Cup several times (1997, 2009, 2011, and 2013). The Hunter/Jumper team competes in the Garden State Horse Show, the largest “AA” horse show in New Jersey – AA being the rating given to the most prestigious of United States Equestrian Federation shows.

 

The Equine Studies Program is thriving today and we look forward to seeing what our students can accomplish for years to come!