History

PROFESSOR ALBERT O. HAMMOND

Over the years, Centenary University has had many supporters devoted to its success. Professor A. O. Hammond is no exception; he dedicated over forty years to Centenary as a teacher of Greek and Latin, stood by the school through its extreme highs and lows, and earned the respect of students and staff alike.

Professor Albert Overton Hammond

Professor Albert Overton Hammond

Professor Albert Overton Hammond joined the Centenary Collegiate Institute (CCI) faculty in 1878 as the head of the Classical Languages and Literature Department. He taught Greek and Latin, serving Centenary for forty-six years before retiring in 1924. A “scholar and gentlemen, [Professor Hammond] stood by CCI through prosperity and adversity, gaining the sincere respect and even reverence of generation after generation of CCI college preparatory students” (Custard, 63). In 1917, Hammond wrote the “History of the Centenary Collegiate Institute Compiled from Original Documents and from the Memory of Events Quorum pars parva fuit by Albert O. Hammond, A.M., during forty years a Member of the Faculty of C.C.I.”. Thanks to his manuscript, a great deal is known about the early years of Centenary. The book Through Golden Years describes Professor Hammond’s manuscript as a “priceless original source from which copious quotations have been made” (Custard, ix-x).

Professor Hammond was essential to Centenary’s success. When the school building was destroyed in the fire of 1899, the President and the Board of Trustees decided that the students and faculty would be dismissed until a new building could be constructed. Professor Hammond strenuously objected, feeling that the students should be able to continue their education uninterrupted. It was left to him to “open and conduct the school during the year 1900 – 1901…with the understanding that he should be financially responsible for the undertaking” (Custard, 89). He ultimately accepted the proposal. Thirty-four students remained in school, taking their classes in a rented hall and boarding with local families. Professor Hammond and recent Goucher College graduate Miss Hannah M. Voorhees each taught eight classes a day. Their hard work meant there would be no break in the continuity of Centenary’s history – no year without a graduating class.

postcard 47

While Professor Hammond taught classes in a rented hall, the new Main Building was being built.

The students of Centenary called Hammond their ‘Beloved Instructor’ and dedicated the 1906 yearbook to him. In 1940, he and his wife, who taught art at Centenary for twelve years, were honored with the Hammond Memorial Gates. A residence hall was dedicated in his honor in 1956 (it was located off the traditional campus, and was at some point sold). “Invariably too, alumni speak with admiration, even veneration, of Professor Hammond, the scholar and gentleman, dignified, kindly, serious, yet with a sense of humor.”

Here follows a letter of thanks to Professor Hammond from an alumnus of CCI:

“While I was at C.C.I., I never did very much with my Greek; I gave too much time to other things and especially foot-ball, but later I realized, as you told us one day in class, its inestimable value to tone’s education and from that time on I made Greek and Greek culture as much a part of myself as possible. So that during the war, serving for two years and four months as a Y.M.C.A. secretary, I was able to entertain and instruct the boys with many a pleasant Greek story; this was especially true during the time I was serving at the front. So you see that you too were serving unwittingly. I wanted you to know this and to thank you for all you have done for me, even though my gratitude is expressed rather late.”

Professor Hammond was greatly missed after he retired but long remembered by students and staff for his contributions to campus life.

 

THE PROGRAM

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the charter of Centenary University! To celebrate, the blog will be highlighting past posts about Centenary’s history.

The school has evolved greatly since it started in 1867. Centenary Collegiate Institute, as it was known in the beginning, taught high school and college preparatory courses. There were two college programs – one for men and one for women. When the school opened in 1874, there were ten basic departments of instruction:

150-04-the-program

Read more about the original classes here!

After the Fire of 1899 destroyed the main building, Centenary ran a day school focusing on college preparatory classes while a new building was being constructed. The institute became an all-girls’ school in 1910, and in 1929 introduced a two-year college degree program. During that time, the College Preparatory School offered programs in general academics, Home Economics, and Music, and the Centenary Junior College was equivalent to the first two years of a standard college course. CJC did so well that in 1940 the Preparatory School was discontinued. The school remained a junior college until 1956, when it adopted the name Centenary College for Women. CCW offered a number of ‘pre-‘ college programs (pre-nursing, pre-occupational therapy) that would give students an introduction to a four-year degree. By the 1970s, the school offered a number of Associate degrees, as well as Bachelor degrees in early childhood and elementary education (B.A.), general studies (B.A.), performing arts (B.F.A.), and medical technology (B.S.).

The school changed its name to Centenary College and started admitting men. It also started increasing its four-year degree programs and introduced graduate degrees. The College is now a University and continues to expand its degree programs.

 

 

LIFE IN PRISM

For over 40 years, the students of Centenary College have published an annual literary magazine known as Prism, featuring poetry and artwork by Centenary students.

Beginning in the spring of 1968 as Through the Prism, a group of students sought to foster more creativity on campus and provide a printed platform for students to freely express their artistic voice. They collected poems and drawing and distributed them on their own using mimeographed copies. Support for the publication was lackluster at best. Fortunately, some members of the faculty recognized this as a positive exercise in creative thinking and under the auspices of the English department, Prism began to operate on a larger scale, aiming toward a true publication.‘  (Spilled Ink, 3/5/1969). At one point, enough works were submitted (many anonymously) that selection committees had to meet twice a week to vet and choose submissions for the magazine (Spilled Ink, 3/27/68, 3/5/69).

Pages from 1968.03.27 Pages from 1968 hi qual ytyd69

left, Spilled Ink, 3/27/1968

right, Through the Prism, 2/16/1968

“Prism does an excellent job of portraying different facets of contemporary life and thought in free verse. The poems and artworks are so typical of today, some abstract, some vividly real.”Spilled Ink, 3/5/69

I’M GOING THROUGH CHANGES

The design and format of Prism has taken various forms over the years.  With volumes in all sizes, shapes, and colors, the magazine leaves behind an impressive and often surreal collection of drawings, paintings, poems, and short stories that offer a window into the hearts and minds of Centenary students spanning almost half a century.

Pages from 1970 winter Pages from 1973 april

Pages from 1974 december   75 prism

Pages from 1975 may     prism76

prism1980   Pages from 1987

left-to-right: Prism: Winter 1970, April 1973, April 1974, December 1974, 1975, 1976, 1980, 1987

PRISM TODAY

With the continuing support of the English department, Prism is still published annually and now accepts submissions from alumni and faculty as well as students of Warren County College (Spilled Ink, 2012)Poetry slams, open mic nights, and other events are held to promote awareness and involvement in the magazine.   Such longstanding opportunities for creativity give students a chance to explore their ideas and collaborate with others, further enriching their time here as well as their education. To quote an article appearing in the student newspaper:

“To the student the poetry of Prism expresses thoughts on love, national concern, life –as a depressing, weary, lonely time and as a beautiful and cheerful experience. It sweeps the mind causing room for contemplation and application. Prism does indeed have something to offer everyone.” – Spilled Ink, 3/5/1969