Month: January 2017

There’s No Business Like Snow Business

Welcome back! After a long winter break, the spring semester is now underway and this January, albeit cold, is just not the quite the same as years gone by here at Centenary.  One major difference this winter: not much snow!

Over the years, Centenary has always been a place to embrace the spirit of the current season, and winter has never been the exception.  For all those of you missing the snowy weather this year…here is a tribute to the winters of Centenary past!

Snow sculptures were also a common winter activity on campus and contests were often held to choose the best. Pictured below are some of the winners over the years:

04-winter1jan1954

Spilled Ink, January 1954

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Spilled Ink, April 1960

 

Has anyone taken any snowy pictures of Centenary this winter?   Share your winter pics with us on Instagram!    @taylormemoriallibrary

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THE DREAM

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the charter of Centenary University! To celebrate, the blog will be highlighting past posts about Centenary’s history.

150-01-the-dreamThe first major year for Centenary University was 1865. At the time, it was nothing more than a dream conceived by Reverend Crook S. Vancleve while taking a walk through a cornfield with Reverend George H. Whitney. Vancleve envisioned an institution at that very spot. It took nine long years and a lot of hard work to take the Institute from dream to reality. The school, which was named Centenary Collegiate Institute in 1866, received its charter in 1867 from the New Jersey Legislature and laid its cornerstone in 1869. Construction slowed as money became scarce, but the Board of Trustees remained dedicated to seeing the school finished. The school was finished and opened in 1874, five years to the day after the cornerstone was laid. To borrow a phrase from Leila Custard, “Centenary Collegiate Institute was off to an auspicious start.” (Custard, 51)

Custard, Leila Roberta. Through Golden Years: 1867 -1943. New York: Lewis
Historical Publishing Company, Inc, 1947. 11- 51. Print.