PERSONALITY PROFILES

Centenary University has always welcomed students from faraway lands. One of our first international students was Tsuna Akira Kuchiki, who went by Daniel. Kuchiki, of Tokyo, Japan, was present for the dedication of Centenary Collegiate Institute’s building in 1874 and graduated from the College Preparatory Classical Course in 1877. Since then hundreds of international students have furthered or completed their post-secondary education here.

A series of newspaper articles called “Personality Profiles” were written by the student newspaper, Spilled Ink, to introduce students to the rest of the Centenary community. Students would be interviewed and asked about themselves and what they thought of Centenary. Many of those students were international students. Here are some of their answers:

elga-hilferding-2Elga Hilferding, 1942

“Who doesn’t know our petite and cute little Rumanina girl? She has a lot of interesting things to tell us about her country. Yes, she was born in Rumania…Did I tell you Elga lived in Bucharest? She says it’s very modern, too, and they even get our movies there as soon as we do…Elga says the average American likes an easy life, going to parties, eating, and not working too hard. Doesn’t that sound just like us…Elga likes American schools, too, because we don’t have to wear an awful uniform as Rumanians do…Goodbye to you all for now from Elga. In Rumanian, it would be “La Revedere.”

Dora and Erna Oskardottir, 1943

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Erna Oskardottir

“Dora and Erna were born in Reykjavik, Iceland, in 1924 and 1925, respectively…Upon their arrival at Centenary, Dora and Erna felt rather timid, but they soon learned that Centenary had many good friends awaiting them. Though it was only last week they started taking English lessons, they have made great strides in learning our language. Both girls intend to come back to Centenary next fall…Centenary welcomes you, Dora and Erna, and we hope you will enjoy your stay with us, as much as we are enjoying having you.”

genevieve-diazGenevieve Diaz, 1943

“In June, 1941, five feet two inches and ninety-six pounds of Genevieve Diaz (plus luggage) came to the United States from her native land, Puerto Rico…Jenny is very fond of American music, but she says she missed the ‘real’ South American rhumba…Reading is one of [her] favorite hobbies along with the music and horse-back riding, but she professes no great liking for ice skating and other winter sports. This is undoubtedly due to Puerto Rico’s milder climate…Genevieve is enjoying her stay at Centenary, but she is also looking forward to attending a larger institution. Centenary offers Genevieve best wishes for her continued success.”

Thorunn Thorsheimson and Josephian Johannessen, 1944

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Thorunn Thorsheimson

“These girls left their home in Reyhjavik [sic], the capital of Iceland, on July 14th…Prior to their arrival in this country, Jossa and Thorunn had never had occasion to speak English…They certainly are doing well since they came here…Quite by chance it was discovered that both Thorunn and Jossa are greatly interested in our America music, both popular and classical. They never heard much of this music until our American soldiers arrived in Iceland…The girls are rapidly acquiring a taste for our American dishes. The diet in Iceland consists chiefly of meat and potatoes. Fruit and vegetables are available only when a ship from our country carries such to them. Neither Jossa nor Thorunn expect to return home until they have completed their education here at Centenary. Let’s all hope that their college career in the United States is a most successful and happy experience.”

Foreign Exchange Students, 1945

personality profile triptych.jpg‘ “Martica Urrutia is a vivacious brunette from Cuba. She and Ninita Wood [sic] usually drive us mad at the dinner table by a confusing code they use. It goes something like this – ‘Pancho’. ‘Carl.’ Ninita has been here in school since she was ten years old and quite proudly says, ‘I am an American!’ From Holland we have with us Yvonne Goetz. She had lived in South America – principally Brazil and Venezuela – for the past ten years and is definitely an accomplished linguist, speaking English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese and Spanish fluently. Personally, I think Yvonne’s heart really lies in Venezuela...And then there is Alyce ‘Sissie’ Robertson from Brooklyn. We are all learning to understand her dialect.” ’

So there are a few of our students from other lands! Let’s hope they enjoyed being at Centenary, as much as we enjoyed having them. Centenary will learn to appreciate lives lived in different parts of the world, especially with the presence of our foreign neighbors.’

*Ninita Wood is spelled Nenita Wood in the 1947 Yearbook.

“Personality Profiles: Elga Hilferding.” Spilled Ink 1942: 12. print.

“Personality Profiles: Icelandic Girls enjoying C.J.C.” Spilled Ink 20 February 1943: 1. print.

“Student from Puerto Rico enjoying stay at C.J.C.” Spilled Ink 15 December 1943: 1. print.

“Icelandic Students.” Spilled Ink 30 September 1944: 2. print.

“Four Foreign Students here.” Spilled Ink 1 November 1945: 3. print.

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CURRENT LIBRARY PROJECTS

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The fall color of the Japanese Zelkova.

The library staff has been working on a project to update Trees of Centenary, a 1990s dendrological* survey done by Dr. Lewis Parrish, the former department head of Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Centenary.

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The tree cataloger and photographer consult the original Trees of Centenary.

Parrish’s book is a compilation of every tree on the Centenary campus, but that information is over twenty years old. The archives staff have taken on the task of updating Trees of Centenary to reflect the  foliage of the current campus. So far, the project has created an inventory of all trees on the north side of campus, including most of the trees listed in Dr. Parrish’s book. The south side of campus will be more challenging as there was no survey done of these trees, and complete identification will have to be done from scratch.

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An excerpt from the rough draft map of the Jefferson Lawn, south side.

How is this task being accomplished? First, every tree in Trees of Centenary was listed and separated by location. The campus was broken down into sections, and each section was given its own hand-drawn map. Then, staff members took the book and the maps and made, well, a mess (see the rough draft map at right). Each tree was numbered, plotted, and matched to a tree from the book. This proved to be difficult because some of the trees mentioned in the 1990s survey are now gone, claimed by disease or death, and new trees have been planted since the survey’s publication.

Realizing a more orderly system was needed, the rough draft map from each portion was input into excel spreadsheets, which became the basis of our new interactive map!

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The fall color of the Green Ash.

This map shows the location of each tree and includes a description and photos, just like the original Trees of Centenary. 

There is still much to be done, and the library hopes to have the entire campus cataloged by Spring 2017. During the winter all the evergreens will be recorded while the remaining deciduous trees will be classified in Spring 2017. Staff will also be taking pictures of the trees in each season. This year’s fall color went by too quickly, but there’s always next year!

*Dendrological: adj., Having to do with the botanical study of trees and other woody plants.

A FIELD TRIP

Recently, three library staff members had the chance to tour Drew University’s archives thanks to an invitation by Dr. Noah Haiduc-Dale and his Research Methods Class. Cassie Brand Interim Head of Special Collections, University Archives, and Methodist Librarian and Matthew Beland Drew University Archivist and Assistant Librarian hosted a tour of two of the university’s buildings: the United Methodist Archives and History Center and Rose Memorial Library.

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The United Methodist Archives and History Center houses any and all items pertaining to the United Methodist Church as well as most of the University’s Special Collections. The Rose Memorial Library is the home of the University Archives.

The tour explored the school’s different archival spaces and observed working projects. Cassie and Matthew also set up several archival items in the Wilson Reading Room for an up-close and personal viewing experience.

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Centenary staff and students had the chance to learn about Drew University’s archives and special collections. It was an invaluable learning experience and the library staff is grateful for the wealth of knowledge on archival practices, methods for displaying exhibits, and the chance to see such great treasures. Thank you Cassie, Matthew, and Drew University!

SPOOK and SPECTRE

 

1908057Perfect for Halloween, here are several pictures of Spook and Spectre, a dormitory society from Centenary Collegiate Institute’s early days. It was organized in 1904 and disbanded in 1910 after Centenary became an all girls school.

Whether they were influenced by spiritualism/occultism or just wanted to be spooky is unknown. Enjoy these great ghoulish photos and happy haunting!

spook and spectre all

PROFESSOR GEORGE E DENMAN

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Denman in 1905

“His life is gentle, and the elements so mixed in him, that nature might arise, and say to all the world: This is a man.”

These words of appreciation were said about a man who came to Centenary Collegiate Institute (C.C.I.) in 1903 and quickly earned the admiration and respect of every student. He was a teacher of Latin, Director of Athletics, House Master of the Boys’ Dormitory, and a friend to all who knew him.

George Edward Denman’s dedication to his athletes led ‘green’ teams to victory year after year. Although his specialty was football, having played for Williams College and Columbia University before becoming an athletics coach, his indomitable spirit commanded Centenary’s sports teams to greatness. Football, basketball, baseball, track – every sport excelled under his instruction.

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Professor Denman, Togo the mascot, and the 1907 Football Team

Denman can also be credited with helping start Centenary’s yearbook. The Athletic Association’s success created a need to produce a yearly historical record intended to emphasize the “prowess of C.C.I.” (Custard, 113). Student Harry H. Runyon suggested creating a school annual and, with the support of Professor Denman, the Athletic Association created the 1904 Hack, the college’s first yearbook. Had it not been for the accomplishments of the Athletic Association (guided by Denman), the yearbook would not have been established so early in Centenary’s history.

Professor Denman stayed at Centenary only 7 years but did enough for the school in those few years to fill a lifetime. He was remembered fondly by his students and will always be remembered by those who treasure Centenary’s past.

THE ART PRIZE

Few details are known about the Art Prize at Centenary College, but what is known is that each year a distinguished piece of student artwork was awarded with the title of Art Prize Winner.

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Art Prize of 1959 – Barbara Candell, “Metrepole”

This painting also won fourth place at the Fifth New Jersey College Art Exhibit at Hunterdon County Art Center in 1959.

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Art Prize of 1927 – Deborah May Lloyd, “Chinese Horse”

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Art Prize of 1927 – signed “deb”

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Art Prize of 1962 – Barbara Joan Weingard, “Dancing Figures”

Many of the winning paintings used to hang in the entrance hall to the President’s House. Now several of them are housed in the Taylor Memorial Library Archives.

 

TO MRS. MONTELL

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Facsimile of Oscar Wilde Photograph

“To Mrs. Montell, my uncle’s old and loved friend from Oscar Wilde, January 26, 1882, Baltimore, Thursday.”

Many items have been donated to the Taylor Memorial Library over the years but not all of them seem directly related to telling Centenary College’s history. A number of items in the archives were donated by faculty, alumni, or other members of the Centenary community, so there are many objects that once held personal significance to the donor, or were donated by someone with personal significance to Centenary. This photograph of Oscar Wilde, presented to the college in 1958, is one such item, seemingly out of place among the yearbooks, class photos and other ‘Centenariana’ stored in the archives.

It came to Centenary College through Dr. H. Graham DuBois, a member of Centenary’s faculty for 33 years. He was a poet and playwright like Wilde, an English professor at Centenary College for Women from 1929 to 1963, and the Chairman of the C.C.W. Division of Humanities from 1947 to 1959. The Mrs. Montell of the inscription was his grandmother, Mrs. Charles Montell, who had been a friend of Wilde’s uncle, Ledoux Elgee.When Wilde visited Baltimore on a lecture tour of America, Mrs. Montell invited him to tea as a courtesy to a family friend. He accepted her invitation and later sent the photograph to thank her.

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Dr. DuBois, left, and Dr. Seay, president of the college

Dr. DuBois donated the framed photograph of the English poet and playwright to the college in 1958. It was displayed in the library for a while but was eventually placed in the archives for preservation.

“Dr. DuBois Gives Picture of Oscar Wilde to C.C.W.” Spilled Ink 25 3 1958: 1. Print.